The Key to Social Media Marketing

The Key to Social Media Marketing

When I'm out networking, people always tell me they aren't sure how to use social media for marketing. It can be intimidating and involves a great deal of experimentation to find the right mix of content, not to mention the fact that every business is different. I've found two questions need to be answered to point marketers in the right direction. First, what is important to you? Second, who are you trying to reach?

It sounds simple enough, but those two basic questions have led to long conversations. In the end, you need to choose the "voice" of your social media channels and know the audience you want to reach.

1. CHOOSE A VOICE

This probably sounds much easier than it really is, but asking yourself what's important to you is a great starting point. Each response that comes to mind can be qualified against how it compliments your business culture, your own ethics, and whether or not it's something you feel your customers will be passionate about.

I've always been something of a privacy nut and I bring that as part of the culture of the company. Not many people think about it at great length, though that's changed some recently. Sure, I could post every news story about hackers stealing personal information, passwords, or defacing sites, but it's really about what people can do to protect their online accounts so that, when a popular site is compromised, their information isn't as vulnerable.

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Bugs and Enhancements and Features! Oh My!

Bugs and Enhancements and Features! Oh My!

With this article, I'll continue a series on the lexicon of app development. In this post, I'll cover something that comes up during many stages of a project, particularly Web applications. When we talk about Web sites, software, and apps, developers often reference "bugs" in the code or mention "enhancements" or "features". If you'd like to know more about the difference, you should keep reading.

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3 Easy Ways to Help Secure Your Web Site

3 Easy Ways to Help Secure Your Web Site

There's been a lot happening in the news recently about stolen passwords, breaking into sites, and other illicit activity. It's important to understand that it's not if you get targeted, it's when. Unfortunately, this is the simple truth of living and doing business in the Internet age. While you may not be able to stop every attempt, it is possible to protect your Web site with some simple steps and easy to install software.

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Web Whatchamacallit: What Is It You Really Need?

Web Whatchamacallit: What Is It You Really Need?

I often forget that, when I'm in "developer mode", I speak a language foreign to many people. For that reason, this is will be my first article discussing concepts and/or jargon that come up frequently during or about projects. First, you may find it helpful to know that when developers talk about Web sites, Web applications, and mobile apps, we are referring to three different, albeit related, types of projects. Carry on if you'd like to find out more.

Web site, Web application, and mobile app projects are each a part of a mobile-era marketing plan and can be (often, are) interconnected in some way, but are very distinct and require different resources, budgets, and expertise. They range from basic brochure sites to custom Web-based applications to mobile apps  and platforms that facilitate communication between one, two, or all three of these types of projects.

"Out of the Box" Solutions

These require special mention because many times they are used for any one of the three project types we are discussing. "Out of the box" (or "Boxed") solutions are the equivalent to software you purchase at your local Best Buy to run on your laptop. For Web sites, you might know them as "plugins" (if you're familiar with WordPress) or "extensions" (if Joomla is more your thing).

Regardless of your chosen platform, boxed solutions often provide complex capabilities (such as an online storefront/ecommerce) without the need to pay someone to develop the logic specifically for you by licensing software that is already available. This tends to be an inexpensive alternative to Web applications, but limits the functionality to how that solution was created and what features already exist for it. It might not let you put some function exactly where you want it to appear (or where your customers have requested), such as on a specific product page, or it might not work with your existing merchant processing service (credit cards), but it saves the expense of having this done for you.

These are all important points to discuss when determining the project's scope. If an out-of-the-box solution can't be found that suits your needs, custom development is your only option.

Web Sites

We'll start with the least complex of these projects. A Web site (or "website") is the equivalent of an online brochure, though you can add ecommerce and other, more complex interactions with your customers, a Web site is rarely more than an extended business card. These days, a Web site is displayed through a Web Application like Joomla or WordPress (called a Content Management System or CMS), but we aren't creating the application itself, only implementing it in order to display content based on customer interaction or allow customers to purchase their favorite hiking pack. Because they are so limited, Web sites tend to be the least expensive kind of project to undertake.

For a professionally designed, custom Web site, you should expect costs of $1,200 or more. It is possible to get them less expensive, but these will not be custom sites and will likely drop your content into a template that has been used many times on other Web sites.

Web Applications

Web applications are separate from Web sites, but are made available to the world in much the same way to work alongside your Web site (or are perhaps the backbone of your site and allows you to manage your content requiring only basic familiarity with Microsoft Word). Typically, Web applications are created to offer some kind of custom functionality, but more often these form the backbone of some internal system that needs to be available to both customers and staff. Web applications tend to be more expensive undertakings and are often considered product development since the application is a product in its own right, often providing some kind of subscription-based service (Dropbox, Gmail, and Outlook.com would all be considered Web Applications) or special feature.

It's important to note that commissioning a custom Web application is the equivalent of creating an entirely new product which is the intellectual property of the client. As a client, you own the application (generally covered under the "work-for-hire" implied contract, but an important fact you should get in writing) and the responsibility for maintenance, as well as addressing bugs, new features, and enhancements (terms all the subject of a future article), all falls on the company who wanted the software created to begin with.  For that reason, the cost is often prohibitive to very small businesses. This can lead to "bootstrapping" using boxed solutions to achieve your goal until you arrive in a position to commission a custom application which can scale properly as your business grows and evolves.

Mobile Apps

The last type of project we'll cover is a mobile app. These are similar to Web applications, but instead run in an isolated environment on a mobile device, whether that's a smart phone or a tablet running Android or iOS. These tend to the most expensive undertaking for two reasons. First, there are many different devices and requires testing many unique scenarios to ensure the app works properly across as many devices as possible.  Second, few apps can operate in complete isolation. In order to communicate between separate mobile devices or between the customer and the business, an app needs a component to accept communications from it. That component is a Web application that accepts and processes communications from the mobile app.

Summary

These are three of the most common types of projects that a custom design and development firm can assist with and its important to jump into the right project with the right developer. All three are linked to an effective mobile marketing strategy, but finding the right type of project to start with can seem daunting. It's often cost-prohibitive to do everything at once. Discuss your current situation with someone who understands the tools that are available and what each can offer so you can take a step in the right direction.

Speaking Geek: A Business Owner's Guide

Speaking Geek: A Business Owner's Guide

So you're a new business and you need to establish your presence online. Or perhaps you've been in business a while and your online identity could use a bit of an upgrade. But where do you start? It can be intimidating talking to someone about your Web site. It's your livelihood and outsourcing the creation and/or maintenance to someone else that may or may not understand your business is known to cause heartburn until trust is established.

When searching for the right person to establish or reinvigorate your digital branding, it's important to know what to expect.

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What is Mobile Marketing?

What is Mobile Marketing?

Earlier this month, I was privileged to speak at the Tempe Chamber of Commerce's Hot Topics luncheon on the topic of mobile marketing. As the technology landscape shifts, the methods of marketing continue to evolve and businesses need to adapt or be left behind. The prevalence of mobile devices opens many avenues to engage customers with a more valuable, relevant experience.

WHAT IS MOBILE MARKETING?

When most people think of mobile marketing they picture a mobile app or Web site. In reality, mobile marketing is so many things, but, at it's core, mobile marketing is reaching out to customers with relevant, timely marketing that reaches their mobile device. Businesses can now interact with their customers using Push Notifications, mobile apps, responsive Web sites, mobile search ads, text message marketing, and location-based advertising. Each of these methods has unique advantages and drawbacks depending on demographic, available budget, and the nature of the business. But why is mobile marketing so important?

WHY MOBILE MARKETING?

If you've ever sat in a shopping district food court, sipping a latté and people-watching, you've probably noticed the amount of time individuals spend looking at their smart phone or tablet. According to recent studies, the average person checks their smart phone every six minutes, 150 times per day. Approximately 40% of a person's time is spent on a mobile device and of that time, and 80% of that time is spent in some type of app.

Mobile devices are becoming the go-to choice to look up information and search traffic originating from mobile devices has increased 200% year over year. In early 2014, statistics show that 1 in 3 Google searches originated on a mobile device and the 2013 holiday shopping season showed us that people use smart phones to look up business information and directions on the go and tablets to purchase. Because email and business information are both commonly accessed on a mobile device, being able to provide a fluid, intuitive experience to potential customers, regardless of how they choose to access your information, is key.

Perhaps the most compelling reasons to be mobile-ready are simply to appeal to customers and what they want. Over half (57%) won't recommend a business with a poorly-designed mobile site and 70% of mobile searches lead to action within one hour. This means that when a potential customer is looking us up on their smart phone, they are looking so that they can purchase, and purchase soon.

WHAT ARE MY OPTIONS?

As with so many things technology-related, there are serveral options of varying complexity and effectiveness. But it comes down to three that can have the greatest impact on the bottom line: mobile search ads, app-based marketing, and location-based marketing.

Mobile search ads aren't really anything new, but there are some features that are. Google AdWordsBing Ads, and others all offer ways to bid on keywords to display your business in highly visible positions on a page. These ads, while highly visible, are also highly coveted and many of the common keywords are priced at prohibitively expensive bids, especially for common businesses where you go up against large companies with marketing budgets bigger than the entire income numbers of many small businesses. One of the recent features added to Google's AdWords layouts is the addition of a "Call" button for mobile ads displayed on a smart phone. These can be highly effective since they give the potential customer a way to instantly contact a business that is relevant.

Mobile search ads can be expensive, but when carefully crafted can increase conversion from potential customer to customer. Because they are highly relevant and timely, these can be very effective, but require a minimum spend of $100 to $500 per month depending on the keywords, industry, and many other factors.

App-based marketing really consists of several different variations on the same type of advertising. Through different advertising providers, such as Google's AdMobFacebook ads, and mMedia, you can provide targeted advertising to users in their favorite apps.  These ads can include images, text, or video. Video ads will gain the highest conversion, but  text or image banners will be served to the greatest number of apps and devices.

Lastly, Location-based marketing is a recent addition to the mobile marketplace. If you've ever had someone throw the term "geofencing" or "beacons" at you when giving you a marketing pitch, they're likely talking about location-based marketing. This kind of marketing is all about localization, personalization, and location history. It relies on access to the GPS location information provided by modern smart phones. When someone installs an app or visits a Web site that uses location-based marketing, they are asked if they would like to give that Web site or mobile app access to their GPS location data. In the case of mobile apps, these permissions are passed through to referenced advertising providers. GPS information can be "fine" or "coarse". Coarse GPS location provides a position that is accurate to approximately 100 to 500 meters. Fine GPS location means the position is accurate to 100 meters or less.

For the purposes of geofencing, where software detects mobile device entry to an area from the size of a city block to an entire city, the accuracy of the information is important because the variance could put someone outside the zone for timely information and easy travel or access to the source of the advertisement. In general, this practice is perfect for brick-and-mortar shops. By advertising with a platform that implements geofencing, you can block out an area immediately surrounding your location and advertisements (in the form of push notifications) will only be sent to devices that indicate their location is inside the "fence". For businesses such as restaurants, sending advertisements just before lunch time to devices currently inside the fence or as they arrive within it can provide a boost in sales. Over time, more targeted advertisements can be created based on the history of a device's locations.

Another type of location-based marketing is even more localized, targeting customers who are already shopping inside a store. Through the use of beacons, which use bluetooth (the same technology that allows you to talk on your smart phone using a wireless headset), push notifications can be sent to devices which have a compatible app alerting customers in the store to sales and specials in their immediate vicinity (bluetooth is typically limited to a range of 50 meters).

Both types of location-based marketing are paired with advertising platforms, notably Foursquare and Swarm. With paid advertising (and, in the case of beacons, specialized hardware strategically placed in a retail location), a personalized, easily accessible product or service can be provided to customers in a position to to act on it immediately.

All this sounds great, but it is important to consider the perceived privacy consumers have come to expect with their information and ensure you provide a relevant, valuable experience. Failure to do so could lead to consumers to disable location sharing or, worse, delete the offending app or Web site. Once that happens, it's very difficult to win them back.

These are just a few of the options available for mobile marketing. There are others, but they have been on the decline or have a limited appeal. These include QR Codes (those strangely abstract squares begging to be scanned for the information they contain) and SMS (or text message) marketing. These can be effective for certain demographics so it is important to know your customer base and understand their communication preferences.

MOBILE MARKETING TIPS

When it comes to mobile marketing, there are a lot of ways you can engage your customers and provide them with a relevant, timely experience. In order to provide the best experience, it's important to consider the medium. Mobile devices, while very powerful, have limited space to display an advertisement and still be readable. Cramming too much on the screen leads to overload and confusion. It's important to stay clear and concise in mobile advertising. Twitter is a great benchmark for messages. If it can't be said in less than 180 characters, you should probably rethink your message or medium. A short, 20-second video can be a great way to get a complex point across and circumvent the space limitation.

Location-based marketing takes this to the extreme, but it's important to optimize your advertising for the viewer's location. Sending them a push notification for coffee at 2 AM while their phone sits on the nightstand next to them might not be the best use of advertising (not to mention that it could wake them up if they haven't silenced their phone - and nobody likes to have their sleep disturbed). If you're using geofencing, keep the monitored area to within a few blocks of your retail location. If you can get location information, do everything you can to make sure that what you show the viewer is nearby, easy to get to, and available when they arrive.

You should also consider your audience. What works for one demographic won't for others. What devices are they using? What apps do they favor? Are they fans of the "check-in" or would they rather have you send something to their email? All of these questions can affect how you advertise and the medium you use.

Finally, experiment and measure. In order to answer the questions we mentioned above, you need data. Sometimes customers will happily tell you the information, other times you have to try something to see what happens. Try variations on text in different locations and check the response. Measure ("benchmark") your results to see what advertising is working and bringing you business and what's not helping. Mobile marketing is an on-going process and needs to be revisited every few months ( at a minimum - almost daily when you're first getting started) and adjusted based on the results.

Mobile marketing is a complex topic, so it's important to meet with someone who knows the ins and outs and can help you focus your efforts. Keep these tips in mind and get to know your customers.

Hot Topics: Marketing Technology

Technology is used in nearly every business function these days and it can be most effective at marketing and growing your company. Peter Adams, founder of Sol Minion Development, and Brian Dunham, Marketing Specialist at ManageStaff Inc, will talk about how embracing emerging technology to grow your business and stay relevant in a rapidly shifting, technology-driven marketplace. We’ll focus on Search Engine Marketing, Social Media, and Mobile Marketing and cover what should be considered to create an effective marketing plan.

Brian Dunham, Marketing Specialist at ManageStaff Inc., will teach how to get noticed online, achieve high SEO rankings and leverage them to increase sales.

Peter Adams, founder of Sol Minion Development, will show how to incorporate mobile platforms into your marketing efforts to increase customer engagement. Attendees will learn practical methods to implement his lessons.

Sol Minion Development Gets an Upgrade

This morning, we rolled out an updated Web site. While much of the design remains the same, we have upgraded to Joomla - a modern content management system. When we aren't working on making our clients shine online, we will continue to make changes to our site and add additional features to better serve our clients.

Looking to make a change to your online presence? Contact us or gives us a call and we will be happy to provide an estimate.

Sol Minion Development Now Microsoft Partner

Sol Minion Development is now a Microsoft Partner. We were accepted into the program this week and can now offer a variety of services on the Microsoft platform, including custom .NET development and other services in the Microsoft and .NET ecosystem.

Looking for custom development? Contact us for a custom proposal and let us help you succeed.

Peter Adams Begins Business Development Council Term

Today marked the first day of Peters chairmanship of the Tempe Chamber of Commerces Business Development Council. Over the next year, he will help members locate and implement new technologies, apps, and resources to benefit and connect them with consumers. The Chamber offers many programs and training opportunities, such as Hot Topics & Lunch, Coffee Connections networking groups, and solution/education clinics for both members and non-members.

Peter Adams to Chair Business Development Council

In addition to being a Tempe Chamber of Commerce Ambassador, Peter Adams, owner of Sol Minion Development, is the incumbent chair of the Business Development Committee. The committee is responsible for cultivating resources and educational programs as well as facilitate networking opportunities.

For more information on the Tempe Chamber of Commerce and its member businesses, see their Web site at www.tempechamber.org.

Benefits of a Custom Web Site

Let's face it, there are a lot of options out there when it comes to establishing or updating your online brand. 61% of customers click away to a competitor site after visiting a Web site that isn't optimized for their mobile device (Source). It's just a matter of when your online brand gets a makeover.

These days, Google incorporates responsiveness into their page rankings and there are numerous services offering to host a mobile-optimized Web site - "no coding experience necessary".

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